Welcome to the GSFC Exoplanet Modeling and Analysis Center (EMAC)

EMAC serves as a repository and integration platform for modeling and analysis resources focused on the study of exoplanet characteristics and environments. EMAC provides community access to hosted models and tools, along with user-friendly web interfaces and a searchable database of exoplanet resources - both those hosted locally by EMAC as well as existing external tools and repositories hosted elsewhere.

EMAC is intended as a clearinghouse for the whole research community interested in exoplanets, where any software or model developer can submit their tool/model as a contribution for others to use. If you would like to submit a new tool/model to EMAC, please visit the Submit a Resource page. If you have suggestions for improvements, please email us at

EMAC is a key project of the GSFC Sellers Exoplanet Environments Collaboration (SEEC). The P.I. is Avi Mandell, and the Deputy P.I. is Eric Lopez; more information on EMAC staffing and organization will be posted shortly.

Atmos

Claire et al. Atm

Atmos is a packaged photochemical model and climate model used to understand the vertical structure of various terrestrial atmospheres. Its photochemical model calculates the profiles of various chemicals in the atmosphere, including both gaseous and aerosol phases. Its climate model calculates the temperature profile of the atmosphere. While individually these models may be run for useful information, when coupled they offer a detailed analysis of atmospheric steady-state structures.

Coronagraphic Mission Simulator v0.1.dev146

Arney et al. Obs

This simplified coronagraph simulator tool is based on the coronagraph noise model in Robinson et al. 2016, adapted by J. Lustig-Yaeger, G. Arney and J. Tumlinson.

Exoplanet Boundaries Calculator v1.0

Kopparapu et al. Atm

The Exoplanet Boundaries Calculator (EBC) is an online calculator that provides condensation boundaries (in stellar fluxes) for ZnS, H2O, CO2 and CH4 for the following planetary radii that represent transition to different planet regimes: 0.5, 1, 1.75, 3.5, 6, and 14.3 RE. The purpose is to classify planets into different categories based on a species condensing in a planet's atmosphere. These boundaries are applicable only for G-dwarf stars.

Exoplanet Composition Interpolator

Eric Lopez, NASA GSFC Int

IN PROGRESS — This tool allows the user to load pre-computed planet evolution models and interpolate between those models to explore the possible structures of transiting exoplanets. Select a planet mass, radius, age, and irradiation and this tool will estimate it’s possible present-day gaseous envelope mass, rocky core mass, and thermal brightness.

EXOSIMS

Savransky et al. Obs

EXOSIMS is a modular, open source, Python-based framework for the simulation and analysis of exoplanet imaging space missions. The base code is highly extensible and allows for the end-to-end simulation of imaging missions, taking into account details about the spacecraft, its orbit, the instrumentation, the assumed population of exoplanets, and the mission operating rules.

HARDCORE

Gabrielle Suissa, David Kipping Int

IN PROGRESS — HARDCORE exploits boundary conditions on exoplanet internal composition to solve for the minimum and maximum core radius fraction based on mass and radius limits.

Lightkurve

Vinícius, Barentsen, Hedges, et al. Fit

IN PROGRESS — The lightkurve Python package offers a beautiful and user-friendly way to analyze astronomical flux time series data, in particular the pixels and lightcurves obtained by NASA’s Kepler, K2, and TESS missions.

PandExo JWST/HST Simulator v1.2.2

Batalha et al. Obs

PandExo is both an online tool and a Python package for generating instrument simulations of JWST's NIRSpec, NIRCam, NIRISS and NIRCam and HST WFC3. It uses throughput calculations from STScI's Exposure Time Calculator, Pandeia.

Planetary Spectrum Generator

Villanueva et al. Atm RT Obs

The Planetary Spectrum Generator (PSG) is an online tool for synthesizing planetary spectra (atmospheres and surfaces) for a broad range of wavelengths (100 nm to 100 mm, UV/Vis/near-IR/IR/far-IR/THz/sub-mm/Radio) from any observatory (e.g., JWST, ALMA, Keck, SOFIA).